Events - October 2018

Wednesday, October 31, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT
Photo of Professor Don Knuth

Donald E. Knuth
Professor Emeritus of The Art of Computer Programming
Stanford University

Abstract: The speaker will answer any question on any subject.

Wednesday, October 31, 2018 — 12:15 PM EDT

Mustafa Korkmaz, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Data centers consume significant amounts of energy and consumption is growing each year. Alongside efforts in the hardware domain, there are some mechanisms in the software domain to reduce energy consumption. One of these mechanisms is dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) and modern servers which are equipped with multi-core CPUs. 

Monday, October 29, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Vijay Ganesh, ECE
University of Waterloo

Monday, October 29, 2018 — 1:30 PM EDT

Aaron Moss, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Friday, October 26, 2018 — 11:00 AM EDT

Rafi Shan Turas, Master’s candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Thursday, October 25, 2018 — 3:30 PM to 6:00 PM EDT
Exploring Blockchain in Waterloo Region banner

Earlier this year, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) created the IEEE Blockchain Initiatives (BCI) to be the hub for all blockchain projects and activities. On October 25, IEEE BCI will be in Waterloo Region to launch their first Canadian group with a networking event at Catalyst137.

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 — 3:00 PM EDT

Ingrid Daubechies
James B. Duke Professor of Mathematics and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University
2018 University of Waterloo Doctor of Mathematics, honoris causa

This inaugural Distinguished Lecture in Applied Math will be given in DC 1302, with a reception to follow in DC 1301, the Fishbowl.

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 — 1:30 PM EDT

Antonina Kolokolova, Department of Computer Science
Memorial University of Newfoundland

A unifying theme in complexity theory in the past few years has been the duality between lower bounds and algorithms. Indeed, some of the main recent lower bounds have been proven by developing better algorithms. 

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 — 12:15 PM EDT

Mina Farid, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

RDF has become a prevalent format to represent disparate data that is ingested from heterogeneous sources. However, data often contains errors due to extraction, transformation, and integration problems, leading to missing or contradicting information that propagate to downstream applications. 

Tuesday, October 23, 2018 — 9:00 AM EDT

Ben Armstrong, Master’s candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Monday, October 22, 2018 — 4:00 PM EDT

Carolyn Lamb, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

This thesis is driven by the question of how computers can generate poetry, and how that poetry can be evaluated. We survey existing work on computer-generated poetry and interdisciplinary work on how to evaluate this type of computer-generated creative product. 

Monday, October 22, 2018 — 2:00 PM EDT

Anonymization with Differential Privacy • Ben Weggenmann
SAP Security Research

Monday, October 22, 2018 — 1:00 PM EDT

Cristina Tavares, Master’s candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Monday, October 22, 2018 — 9:30 AM EDT

Amira Ghenai, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Friday, October 19, 2018 — 2:00 PM EDT

Ju Wang, Postdoctoral fellow
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Passive radio frequency identification (RFID) tags are ubiquitous today due to their low cost (a few cents), relatively long communication range (7–11 m), ease of deployment, lack of battery, and small form factor. This talk shows how even hobbyists can transform commodity RFID tags into sensors by physically altering ('hacking') them using COTS sensors and a pair of scissors. Importantly, this requires no change to commercial RFID readers.

Friday, October 19, 2018 — 1:00 PM EDT

Chathura Kankanamge, Master’s candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Thursday, October 18, 2018 — 10:30 AM EDT

Kristofer Siy, Graduate student
Combinatorics and Optimization

Tuesday, October 16, 2018 — 1:00 PM EDT

Ankit Vadehra, Master’s candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Monday, October 15, 2018 — 5:30 PM EDT

Yaron Minsky, Technology Group Head
Jane Street

Trading in financial markets is a data-driven affair, and as such, it requires applications that can efficiently filter, transform and present data to users in real time.

But there's a difficult problem at the heart of building such applications: finding a way of expressing the necessary transformations of the data in a way that is simultaneously easy to understand and efficient to execute over large streams of data.

Monday, October 15, 2018 — 2:00 PM EDT

Woojung Kim, Master’s candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Monday, October 15, 2018 — 1:30 PM EDT

Yaron Minsky, Technology Group Head
Jane Street

Electronic exchanges play an important role in the world’s financial system, acting as focal points where actors from across the world meet to trade with each other.

But building an exchange is a difficult technical challenge, requiring high transaction rates, low, deterministic response times, and serious reliability.

Monday, October 15, 2018 — 10:30 AM EDT

Mohammad Sadoghi
University of California, Davis

Friday, October 12, 2018 — 4:00 PM EDT

Peiyuan Liu, Master’s candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Thursday, October 11, 2018 — 10:00 AM EDT

Bailey Kacsmar, Master’s candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Repairable secret sharing schemes are secret sharing schemes where, without the original dealer who distributed the shares, the participants can combine information from their shares to perform a computation which reconstructs a share for a participant who has lost their share. 

Wednesday, October 10, 2018 — 1:30 PM EDT

Anna Lubiw
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

In this talk I will look at geometric graph representations from the perspective of three issues: the algorithmic complexity of finding a representation; the bit complexity of the representation; and whether there is a morph between any two combinatorially equivalent representations.

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