Tuesday, April 17, 2018 — 10:30 AM EDT

Magnus Madsen
Aalborg University, Denmark

Most software contains bugs, unintended behavior that causes the program to misbehave or crash. Developers wish to avoid bugs, but are easily led astray by the complexity of modern programming languages. How can we help them? A possible solution is to develop program analysis techniques that can automatically reason about the behavior of programs and pinpoint potential problems.

Monday, April 16, 2018 — 10:00 AM EDT

Hicham El-Zein, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Thursday, April 12, 2018 — 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM EDT

Come support fellow colleague, Rina Wehbe (PhD Candidate, Computer Science) as she examines the effects of gamificiation and Games4Change on behaviour and motivation at the upcming GRADtalks event.  

Thursday, April 12, 2018 — 10:30 AM EDT

Maryam Mehri Dehvani
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rutgers University

The emergence of stupendously large matrices in applications such as data mining and large-scale scientific simulations has rendered the classical software frameworks and numerical methods inadequate in many situations. In this talk, I will demonstrate how building domain-specific compilers and reformulating classical mathematical methods significantly improve the performance and scalability of large-scale applications on modern computing platforms.

Wednesday, April 11, 2018 — 1:30 PM EDT

Aayush Rajasekaran, Master's candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Monday, April 9, 2018 — 1:00 PM EDT

William Callaghan, Master’s candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Monday, April 9, 2018 — 1:00 PM EDT

Ahmed El-Roby, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Today, there is an abundance of structured data available on the web in the form of RDF graphs and relational (i.e., tabular) data. This data comes from heterogeneous sources, and realizing its full value requires integrating these sources so that they can be queried together. Due to the scale and heterogeneity of the data sources on the web, integrating them is typically an automatic process.

Monday, April 9, 2018 — 10:30 AM EDT

Thomas Steinke, Postdoctoral researcher
IBM Almaden Research Center

As data is being more widely collected and used, privacy and statistical validity are becoming increasingly difficult to protect. Sound solutions are needed, as ad hoc approaches have resulted in several high-profile failures.

Friday, April 6, 2018 — 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM EDT

Come out to The Critical Media Lab at 44 Gaukel Street in Kitchener is experience the first ever Computational Digital Art Capstone Exhibition, where you will see interactive and digital art pieces made by students from the University of Waterloo!

Featured artists
Erin Kim
Helga Jiang
Susie Su
Simon Yu
Bonnie Wu
Stephanie Lin
Saadiya Desai
Jennifer Wu
Jimmie Shan

Friday, April 6, 2018 — 1:00 PM EDT

Xiao-Bo Li, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Thursday, April 5, 2018 — 4:00 PM EDT

Xiao-Bo Li, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Thursday, April 5, 2018 — 1:00 PM EDT

Edward Zulkoski, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Thursday, April 5, 2018 — 12:00 PM EDT

Edward Zulkoski, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Wednesday, April 4, 2018 — 3:00 PM EDT

Thad Starner, School of Interactive Computing
Georgia Institute of Technology

Wednesday, April 4, 2018 — 1:30 PM EDT

Hicham El-Zein, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

We present succinct data structures for one-dimensional color reporting and color counting problems. We are given a set of $n$ points with integer coordinates in the range $[1,m]$ and every point is assigned a color from the set $\{\,1,\ldots,\sigma\,\}$. A color reporting query asks for the list of distinct colors that occur in a query interval $[a,b]$ and a color counting query asks for the number of distinct colors in $[a,b]$.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018 — 12:00 PM EDT

Feng-Xuan Choo, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Tuesday, April 3, 2018 — 10:30 AM EDT

Chengnian Sun, Software Engineer
Google Inc., Mountain View, USA

Wednesday, March 28, 2018 — 10:30 AM EDT

Dakshita Khurana, PhD candidate
Department of Computer Science, UCLA

Can we provably immunize protocols against coordinated attacks on the internet? Can we verify that computation is performed correctly while preserving the privacy of underlying data? Can we enable mutually distrusting participants to securely compute on distributed private data?

These are some of the core challenges that lie at the heart of modern cryptography and secure protocol design.

Monday, March 26, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT
photo of Jennifer Widom

Jennifer Widom
​Frederick Emmons Terman Dean, School of Engineering
Fletcher Jones Professor, Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
Stanford University

Monday, March 26, 2018 — 10:30 AM EDT

Xi He, PhD candidate
Computer Science Department, Duke University

Thursday, March 22, 2018 — 10:30 AM EDT

Charles Perin, Department of Computer Science
City, University of London

We live in an increasingly data-driven world, where commercial, societal, environmental, and political decisions are made based on data. However, we also live in a world where most people lack the literacy required to participate in the data-informed debates of modern society. Perhaps the main barrier to improving people’s data literacy is that data is often associated with complexity, large scale, corporatism, and dystopia.

But data is about people.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018 — 7:30 PM EDT

What are we? By what processes and patterns did we originate and how do these patterns compare to the processes of the world around us, digital and biological, societal and fictional?

Wednesday, March 21, 2018 — 1:30 PM EDT

Hicham El-Zein, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Tuesday, March 20, 2018 — 4:00 PM EDT

Daniel Recoskie, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Tuesday, March 20, 2018 — 10:30 AM EDT

Haifeng Xu, PhD candidate
Computer Science Department, University of Southern California

Strategic interactions among self-interested agents (a.k.a., games) are ubiquitous, ranging from economic activity in daily life and the Internet to defender-adversary interactions in national security. A key variable influencing agents' strategic decision making is the information they have available about their environment as well as the preferences and actions of others. 

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