Friday, November 23, 2018 — 1:30 PM EST

Xinan Yan, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Wednesday, November 21, 2018 — 1:30 PM EST

Abel Molina, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Yao (1993) proved that quantum Turing machines and uniformly generated quantum circuits are polynomially equivalent computational models: t >= n steps of a quantum Turing machine running on an input of length n can be simulated by a uniformly generated family of quantum circuits with size quadratic in t, and a polynomial-time uniformly generated family of quantum circuits can be simulated by a quantum Turing machine running in polynomial time.

Wednesday, November 21, 2018 — 12:15 PM EST

Hemant Saxena, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

We address the problem of discovering dependencies from distributed big data. Existing (non-distributed) algorithms focus on minimizing computation by pruning the search space of possible dependencies. However, distributed algorithms must also optimize data communication costs, especially in current shared-nothing settings. 

Thursday, November 15, 2018 — 10:30 AM EST

Professor Brian Forrest
Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo

There are many challenges to teaching mathematics in a fully online environment. In this talk I will show the important role that assigned work plays in mitigating many of these challenges. I will also speak about how my experience in teaching online has impacted the way in which I approach my on campus courses.

Thursday, November 15, 2018 — 10:00 AM EST

Jeff Avery, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Wednesday, November 14, 2018 — 12:15 PM EST

Amine Mhedhbi, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

We study the problem of optimizing subgraph queries (SQs) using the new worst-case optimal (WCO) join plans in Selinger-style cost-based optimizers. WCO plans evaluate SQs by matching one query vertex at a time using multiway intersections. The core problem in optimizing WCO plans is to pick an ordering of the query vertices to match. 

We make two contributions:

Friday, November 2, 2018 — 2:30 PM EDT

Nate Cardozo, Senior Staff Attorney
Electronic Frontier Foundation

Encryption is legal in the Five Eyes countries, thanks to our victory in what’s come to be known as the Crypto Wars of the 1990s. Computer security research is increasingly viewed as a boon rather than a scourge. But time is a circle and once again, law enforcement and policy makers around the world are calling for all that to change. 

Friday, November 2, 2018 — 1:30 PM EDT

Bushra Aloraini, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Friday, November 2, 2018 — 10:00 AM EDT

Yuwei Jiao, Master’s candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Thursday, November 1, 2018 — 10:30 AM EDT

Andrew Beltaos / Amenda Chow
University of Waterloo / York University

Teaching via analogies builds upon students' existing knowledge. New concepts that are taught only within the context of mathematics may seem foreign to students at first glance, but if students have already learned analogous concepts elsewhere in life, as educators, we can make use of their existing framework to strengthen their learning. 

Wednesday, October 31, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT
Photo of Professor Don Knuth

Donald E. Knuth
Professor Emeritus of The Art of Computer Programming
Stanford University

Abstract: The speaker will answer any question on any subject.

Wednesday, October 31, 2018 — 12:15 PM EDT

Mustafa Korkmaz, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Data centers consume significant amounts of energy and consumption is growing each year. Alongside efforts in the hardware domain, there are some mechanisms in the software domain to reduce energy consumption. One of these mechanisms is dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) and modern servers which are equipped with multi-core CPUs. 

Monday, October 29, 2018 — 3:30 PM EDT

Vijay Ganesh, ECE
University of Waterloo

Monday, October 29, 2018 — 1:30 PM EDT

Aaron Moss, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Friday, October 26, 2018 — 11:00 AM EDT

Rafi Shan Turas, Master’s candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Thursday, October 25, 2018 — 3:30 PM to 6:00 PM EDT
Exploring Blockchain in Waterloo Region banner

Earlier this year, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) created the IEEE Blockchain Initiatives (BCI) to be the hub for all blockchain projects and activities. On October 25, IEEE BCI will be in Waterloo Region to launch their first Canadian group with a networking event at Catalyst137.

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 — 3:00 PM EDT

Ingrid Daubechies
James B. Duke Professor of Mathematics and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University
2018 University of Waterloo Doctor of Mathematics, honoris causa

This inaugural Distinguished Lecture in Applied Math will be given in DC 1302, with a reception to follow in DC 1301, the Fishbowl.

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 — 1:30 PM EDT

Antonina Kolokolova, Department of Computer Science
Memorial University of Newfoundland

A unifying theme in complexity theory in the past few years has been the duality between lower bounds and algorithms. Indeed, some of the main recent lower bounds have been proven by developing better algorithms. 

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 — 12:15 PM EDT

Mina Farid, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

RDF has become a prevalent format to represent disparate data that is ingested from heterogeneous sources. However, data often contains errors due to extraction, transformation, and integration problems, leading to missing or contradicting information that propagate to downstream applications. 

Tuesday, October 23, 2018 — 9:00 AM EDT

Ben Armstrong, Master’s candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Monday, October 22, 2018 — 4:00 PM EDT

Carolyn Lamb, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

This thesis is driven by the question of how computers can generate poetry, and how that poetry can be evaluated. We survey existing work on computer-generated poetry and interdisciplinary work on how to evaluate this type of computer-generated creative product. 

Monday, October 22, 2018 — 2:00 PM EDT

Anonymization with Differential Privacy • Ben Weggenmann
SAP Security Research

Monday, October 22, 2018 — 1:00 PM EDT

Cristina Tavares, Master’s candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Monday, October 22, 2018 — 9:30 AM EDT

Amira Ghenai, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Friday, October 19, 2018 — 2:00 PM EDT

Ju Wang, Postdoctoral fellow
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

Passive radio frequency identification (RFID) tags are ubiquitous today due to their low cost (a few cents), relatively long communication range (7–11 m), ease of deployment, lack of battery, and small form factor. This talk shows how even hobbyists can transform commodity RFID tags into sensors by physically altering ('hacking') them using COTS sensors and a pair of scissors. Importantly, this requires no change to commercial RFID readers.

Pages

S M T W T F S
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
  1. 2019 (180)
    1. September (7)
    2. August (18)
    3. July (12)
    4. June (23)
    5. May (23)
    6. April (32)
    7. March (25)
    8. February (16)
    9. January (24)
  2. 2018 (221)
    1. December (16)
    2. November (19)
    3. October (26)
    4. September (23)
    5. August (17)
    6. July (20)
    7. June (13)
    8. May (25)
    9. April (34)
    10. March (24)
    11. February (3)
    12. January (1)
  3. 2017 (36)
  4. 2016 (21)
  5. 2015 (36)
  6. 2014 (33)
  7. 2013 (23)
  8. 2012 (4)
  9. 2011 (1)
  10. 2010 (1)
  11. 2009 (1)
  12. 2008 (1)