PhD Defence • Scientific Computation — Optimization Methods for Semi-Supervised LearningExport this event to calendar

Tuesday, May 8, 2018 — 10:00 AM EDT

Edward Cheung, PhD candidate
David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science

The goal of this thesis is to provide efficient optimization algorithms for some semi-supervised learning (SSL) tasks in machine learning. For many machine learning tasks, training a classifier requires a large amount of labeled data; however, providing labels typically requires costly manual annotation. Fortunately, there is typically an abundance of unlabeled data that can be easily collected for many domains. In this thesis, we focus on problems where an underlying structure allows us to leverage the large amounts of unlabeled data, while only requiring small amounts of labeled data. In particular, we consider low-rank matrix completion problems with applications to recommender systems, and semi-supervised support vector machines (S3VM) to solve binary classification problems, such as digit recognition or disease classification.

For the first class of problems, we study convex approximations to the low-rank matrix completion problem. Instead of restricting the solution space to low-rank matrices, we use the trace norm as a convex surrogate. Unfortunately, many trace norm minimization algorithms scale very poorly in practice since they require a full singular value decomposition (SVD) at each iteration. Recently, there has been renewed interest in the trace norm constrained problem utilizing the Frank-Wolfe algorithm, which only requires calculating the leading singular vector pair, providing an order of magnitude improvement on the iteration complexity. However, the Frank-Wolfe algorithm empirically has very slow convergence and in practice yields high-rank solutions, which greatly increases computational costs. To address this issue, we investigate a rank-drop step for Frank-Wolfe, which solves a subproblem specifically designed to decrease the rank of the iterate, ensuring that the Frank-Wolfe algorithm converges along a low-rank path. We show that this rank-drop subproblem can be decomposed into two cases, where each subproblem can be solved efficiently and we guarantee that the iterates remain feasible, preserving the projection-free property of Frank-Wolfe.

Next we show that these ideas can be used to provide scalable algorithms for simultaneously sparse and low-rank matrix completion problems. We extend the Frank-Wolfe analysis to accommodate nonsmooth objectives, can be used to solve the simultaneously sparse and low-rank problem. We replace the traditional linear approximation used in Frank-Wolfe by a uniform affine approximation to better address poor local approximations given by the first-order Taylor approximation. We show that this naturally leads to a sequence of smooth functions that uniformly converges to the original nonsmooth objective, allowing for a careful balance between approximation quality and convergence that is closely related to the step sizes of the Frank-Wolfe algorithm. We apply this algorithm to solve sparse covariance estimation problems, graph link prediction, and robust matrix completion problems.

Finally, we propose a variant of self-training for the semi-supervised binary classification problem by leveraging ideas from S3VM. To address common issues associated with self-training, such as error propagation and label imbalances, we proposed an adaptive scheme using the functional margin of S3VM to construct a confidence measure. The confidence score is used to create rules to adapt the optimization problems to incorporate label uncertainty and class imbalances. Moreover, we show that the incremental training approach leverages warm-starts very well, leading to much faster training than standard S3VM methods alone, with much stronger empirical performance on imbalanced datasets.

Location 
DC - William G. Davis Computer Research Centre
2314
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

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