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Linux Driver Software: Broadcom NetXtreme™ Gigabit Ethernet Adapter User's Guide

This document describes the installation and configuration of the Linux driver and BASP driver software for the Broadcom NetXtreme™ Gigabit Ethernet Adapter and includes the following sections:

Linux Driver Software

BASP Driver for Linux


Linux Driver Software

This section contains the following information:

Introduction

Limitations

Packaging

Installing Linux Driver Software

Patching PCI Files

Patching Driver Into Kernel

Network Installation

Removing Linux Driver

Module Parameters

Driver Messages

Statistics


Introduction

This section describes the Linux driver for the Broadcom NetXtreme BCM5700 series 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet Network Controllers.


Limitations

The current version of the Linux driver has been thoroughly tested on Red Hat 8.0 and 2.1 AS Linux distributions for i386 and other similar Linux distributions using 2.4.x kernels.

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Packaging

The Linux driver is released in three packaging formats: source RPM, binary RPM (Red Hat distributions only) and compressed tar formats. The file names for the three packages are bcm5700-<version>.src.rpm, bcm5700-<version>.i386.rpm and bcm5700-<version>.tar.gz, respectively. Identical source files to build the driver are included in both RPM and TAR source packages. The tar file contains additional utilities such as patches and driver diskette images for network installation. The Binary RPM contains only the pre-compiled object file for Red Hat 8.0 and 2.1 AS distributions.

 

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Installing Linux Driver Software

The section describes the following Linux driver installations:

Installing Source RPM Package

  1. Install the source RPM package:

    rpm -ivh bcm5700-<version>.src.rpm

  2. Change the directory to the RPM path and build the binary driver for your kernel:

    cd /usr/src/{redhat,OpenLinux,turbo,packages,rpm ..}
    rpm -bb SPECS/bcm5700.spec or rpmbuild -bb SPECS/bcm5700.spec

    Note that the RPM path is different for different Linux distributions.

  3. NOTE While attempting to install a source RPM you may receive the message:

    error: cannot create %sourcedir /usr/src/redhat/SOURCES

    The most likely cause is that the rpm-build package has not been installed. To rectify the situation, locate the rpm-build package on the Red Hat installation media and install it using the command:

    rpm -ivh rpm-build-<version>.i386.rpm

    Complete the installation of the source RPM as previously described..


  4. Install the newly built package (driver and man page):

    rpm -ivh RPMS/i386/bcm5700-<version>.i386.rpm

    Note that the --force option is needed if installing on some distributions that may already contain an older version of the driver.

    The driver will be installed in one of the following paths:

    /lib/modules/<kernel_version>/net/bcm5700.o

  5. /lib/modules/<kernel_version>/kernel/drivers/net/bcm5700.o

    /lib/modules/<kernel_version>/kernel/drivers/net/bcm/bcm5700.o

    or

    /lib/modules/<kernel_version>/kernel/drivers/addon/bcm5700/bcm5700.o

  6. Load the driver:

    insmod bcm5700

  7. To configure the network protocol and address, refer to Linux-specific documentation.

Building Driver From TAR File

  1. Create a directory and extract the TAR files:

tar xvzf bcm5700-<version>.tar.gz

  1. Build the driver bcm5700.o as a loadable module for the running kernel:

    cd src
    make

  2. Test the driver by loading it:

    insmod bcm5700.o

    Note that no message should be returned if this command executes properly.

  3. Install the driver and man page:

    make install

    NOTE See the RPM instructions above for the location of the installed driver.

  4. To configure network protocol and address, refer to the manuals supplied with your operating system.

Installing the Binary RPM Package - (Red Hat 8.0 and 2.1 AS only)

The binary RPM packages contain pre-compiled kernel modules for the above Red Hat Linux distributions. These modules are designed only for the default kernels on these distributions. If you have customized or rebuilt your kernel you may need to install your bcm5700 module using the source RPM package described above.

  1. Install the binary RPM package:

    rpm -ivh bcm5700-<version>.i386.rpm

  2. Bring down interfaces using the bcm5700 module and remove module.

    ifconfig eth# down
    rmmod bcm5700

  3. Install new module and bring up interface.

    insmod bcm5700
    ifconfig eth# 192.168.x.x up

NOTE The example above is specific to static addresses.

 

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Patching PCI Files (Optional)

To use the Red Hat kudzu hardware detection utility, a number of files containing PCI vendor and device information need to be patched with information on the BCM570x series NICs. The most recent Red Hat distributions are included. Apply the appropriate patch by running the patch command. For example, on Red Hat 8.0 for i386, apply the patch by doing the following:

patch -N -p1 -d /usr < pci-rh80-i386.patch

Run kudzu:

kudzu

 

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Patching Driver Into Kernel (Optional)

Patch files are included for patching the driver into some of the latest 2.4.x kernel source trees. This step is optional and should only be done by users familiar with configuring and building the kernel. The patch will modify the orginal kernel's source code.

Follow the following steps to patch the driver into kernel:

1. Select the patch file that matches your kernel and apply the patch:

patch -p1 -d <kernel_src_root> < bcm5700-<version>-2.4.<x>.patch

where <version> is the version of the bcm570x driver and 2.4.<x> is the version of the kernel to patch (e.g., 2.4.10).

NOTE <kernel_src_root> is usually /usr/src/linux or /usr/src/linux-2.4.<x>
  1. Configure the kernel to include the bcm570x driver. It can be found under Network Device Support > Ethernet (1000 Mbit) > Broadcom BCM5700 support when make menuconfig is run. Select built-in or module for the driver:
  2. cd <kernel_src_root>
    make menuconfig

  3. Compile the kernel:

    make dep
    make clean
    ....
    ....

 

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Network Installation

For network installations through NFS, FTP, or HTTP (using a network boot disk or PXE), a driver diskette that contains the bcm570x driver may be needed. The driver diskette images for the most recent Red Hat versions are included. Boot drivers for other Linux versions can be compiled by modifying the Makefile and the make environment. Further information is available from Red Hat's website, http://www.redhat.com.

To create the driver diskette, select the appropriate image file and do the following:

dd if=dd.img of=/dev/fd0H1440.

 

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Removing the Linux Driver

The section describes Removing of the following Linux drivers:

Removing the Driver from an RPM Installation

To unload the driver, use ifconfig to bring down all eth# interfaces opened by the driver, then do the following:

rmmod bcm5700


If the driver was installed using rpm, do the following to remove it:

rpm -e bcm5700

Removing the Driver from a TAR Installation

If the driver was installed using make install from the tar file, the driver bcm5700.o has to be manually deleted from the system. Refer to the section "Installing Source RPM Package" for the location of the installed driver.

Uninstalling the Binary RPM Package - (Red Hat 8.0 and 2.1 AS only)

  1. Uninstall the binary RPM package:

    rpm -e bcm5700

    Note that the backed up copy of the original bcm5700 module will be restored after you unload and reload the driver, where appropriate.


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Module Parameters

Optional parameters for the driver can be supplied as command line arguments to the insmod command. Typically, these parameters are set in the file /etc/modules.conf (see the man page for modules.conf). These parameters take the form

<parameter>=value[,value,...]

where the multiple values for the same parameter are for multiple NICs installed in the system.

NOTE The default or other meaningful values will be used when invalid values are selected. Some combinations of parameter values may conflict and lead to failures. The driver cannot detect all such conflicting combinations.

All the module parameters are listed below.

If line_speed is set to 10, 100, or 1000, the NIC will autonegotiate for the selected speed (and selected duplexity) if auto_speed is set to 1. If auto_speed is set to 0, the selected speed and duplexity will be set without autonegotiation. Note that 1000 Mbps must be negotiated for copper twisted pair links.

Note that this parameter is ignored and assumed 1 if line_speed is set to 0.

Enables or disables TCP Segmentation Option (TSO) when using kernels that support it.

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Driver Messages

The following are the most common sample messages that may be logged in the file /var/log/messages. Use dmesg -n <level> to control the level at which messages will appear on the console. Most systems are set to level 6 by default.

Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet Driver bcm5700 with Broadcom NIC Extension (NICE) ver. 5.0.17 (01/10/03)

Driver signon

eth#: Broadcom BCM5701 1000Base-T found at mem faff0000, IRQ 16, node addr 0010180402d8
eth#: Broadcom BCM5701 Integrated Copper transceiver found
eth#: Scatter-gather ON, 64-bit DMA ON, Tx Checksum ON, Rx Checksum ON

NIC detected

bcm5700: eth# NIC Link is Up, 1000 Mbps full duplex

Link up and speed indication

bcm5700: eth# NIC Link is Down

Link down indication

 

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Statistics

Detailed statistics and configuration information can be viewed in the file /proc/net/nicinfo/eth#.info.

 

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BASP Driver for Linux

NOTE Dell supports only the the Advanced Features in the Red Hat Linux Advanced Server editions.

This section contains the following information:

BASP Overview

Packaging

Installing BASP

Installing the BASP Source RPM Package

Installing the BASP Binary RPM Package (Red Hat 8.0 and 2.1 AS only)

Installing BASP TAR Archive

BASP Files

BASP Configuration for Red Hat Distribution

BASP Configuration and Startup for Other Linux Distributions

BASP Configuration Scripts for Red Hat Distributions

Broadcom NICE Patches

Uninstalling the BASP RPM Package (Both Source and Binary)

Removal of Physical Interface in Generic Trunking and 802.3ad Mode

BASP SNMP Agent for Linux

Known Problems


BASP Overview

BASP is a kernel module designed for 2.4.x kernels that provides load-balancing, fault-tolerance, and VLAN features. These features are provided by creating teams that consist of multiple NIC interfaces. A team can consist of 1 to 8 NIC interfaces and each interface can be designated primary, or hot-standby (SLB team only). All primary NIC interfaces in a team will participate in Load-balancing operations by sending and receiving a portion of the total traffic. Hot-standby interfaces will take over in the event that all primary interfaces have lost their links. VLANs can be added to a team to allow multiple VLANs with different VLAN IDs. A virtual device is created for each VLAN added.

BASP also provides remote management through the SNMP protocol, and this package is installed separately (see "BASP SNMP Agent for Linux").

 

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Packaging

BASP is released in three packaging formats: source RPM, binary RPM (Red Hat distributions only) and compressed tar formats. The file names for the three packages are basplnx-<version>.src.<arch>.rpm, basplnx-<version>.i386.rpm and basplnx-<version>.<arch>.tgz, respectively. Identical source files to build the driver are included in both RPM and TAR source packages. The Binary RPM contains only the pre-compiled IA32 object file for Red Hat 8.0 and 2.1 AS only.

 

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Installing BASP

BASP for Linux is shipped in mixed forms, where the platform and kernel specific files are in source code, and the core file is in object form. Three packages are shipped in this release: two tar archives and two RPM packages.

basplnx-{version}.i386.tgz is the tar archive for i386 platform.

For users of Red Hat distributions, follow instructions in "Installing the BASP Source RPM Package" or "Installing the BASP Binary RPM Package" sections.

For users of other Linux i386 distribution, follow instructions in "Installing BASP TAR Archive" section.

 

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Installing the BASP Source RPM Package

  1. To install the RPM source package, run

    % rpm -i basplnx-{version}.src.{arch}.rpm

  2. Change directory to the RPM path and build the binary driver for
    the kernel (use rpmbuild for Red Hat 8.0 or later)

    % cd /usr/src/redhat
    % rpm -bb SPECS/basplnx.spec or rpmbuild -bb SPECS/basplnx.spec

    Note that the RPM path is different for different Linux distributions.

    NOTE While attempting to install a source RPM you may receive the message:

    error: cannot create %sourcedir /usr/src/redhat/SOURCES

    The most likely cause is that the rpm-build package has not been installed. To rectify the situation, locate the rpm-build package on the Red Hat installation media and install it using the command:

    rpm -ivh rpm-build-<version>.i386.rpm

    Complete the installation of the source RPM as previously described..

  1. Install the newly built package

    % rpm -i RPMS/i386/basplnx-{version}.{arch}.rpm

    The driver and other required files will be automatically installed.

  2. To load the driver

    % insmod basp

  3. Refer to "BASP Configuration for Red Hat Distribution" to set up the teams.

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Installing the BASP Binary RPM Package (Red Hat 8.0 and 2.1 AS only)

  1. To install the binary RPM package, run

    % rpm -i basplnx-{version}.i386.rpm

    The driver and other required files will be automatically installed

    Refer to "BASP Configuration for Red Hat Distribution" to set up the teams.

 

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Installing BASP TAR Archive

To uncompress and expand the tar archive, run

% tar xvfz basplnx-{version}.{arch}.tgz

The installation process involves the following steps:

  1. After extraction, change the directory to where the BASP source files are located.

    % cd basplnx-{version}

  2. To build kernel module, "basp.o":

    % make

    NOTE The Make process will automatically build the correct module for different kernel options, e.g. symbol versioning and SMP support. There is NO need to define -DMODVERSIONS in the Makefile.

  3. To create device file and to copy files:

    % make install

  4. To update the module reference:

    % depmod -a

  5. To load the driver:

    % insmod basp

  6. Refer to "BASP Configuration and Startup for Other Linux Distribution" to set up the teams.

 

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BASP Files

Makefile makefile
baspcfg precompiled configuration utility
bcmtype.h commonly used type header file
blf.c BASP module entry points
blf.h ioctl interface
blfcore.h core interface
blfcore.o precompiled core object
blfopt.h automatically generated header file from Make
blfver.h version header file
nicext.h NICE header file
pal.c platform abstraction implementation
pal.h header for platform abstraction
release.txt this file
nice-2.2.16 NICE enabled driver for 2.2 kernel
nice-2.4.16 NICE enabled driver for 2.4 kernel
scripts contains sample scripts
scripts/basp init script, goes to /etc/rc.d/init.d
scripts/baspteam start/stop script, goes to /etc/basp
scripts/baspif start/stop network, i/f, goes to /etc/basp
scripts/team-sample sample script of SLB team with three NICs
scripts/team-gec sample script of GEC team with three NICs
scripts/team-vlan sample script of SLB team with 2 VLANs
basp.4
man page
baspcfg.8 man page for baspcfg utility

 

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BASP Configuration for Red Hat Distribution

NOTE To avoid failover problems when using BASP, make sure that the spanning tree is disabled on the switch to which the network adapter is connected.



NOTE When adding 64 VLANs, the 64th VLAN must have a VLAN ID of 0 (63 VLANs are tagged and 1 VLAN is untagged).
NOTE VLANs are not supported on non-Broadcom adapters. It is supported on the Alteon® adapters if the ALT.LAN provided by Broadcom is used. If a non-Broadcom adapter is a member of a failover team, VLANs will not be supported for that team.

The BASP distribution includes a utility program and several scripts for team configuration. Following steps for Red Hat Linux distributions only. Most of the steps are only required to be performed after the first time installation. Step 2 "Modify the configuration script" should be performed whenever there is any change to the team configuration.

Since Red Hat distributions do not automatically load drivers for network devices unless the device is configured with an IP address, users must manually configure a network-script file for all physical adapters that will be team members. Network script files are located under /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts. The file name must be prefixed with "ifcfg-" then the physical adapter alias. For interface eth0, you would create a file with the name ifcfg-eth0, then add the below content.

Example:

DEVICE=eth0
BOOTPROTO=static
ONBOOT=yes

For users of other Linux distributions, follow instructions in the "baspcfg" section.

The configuration process involves the following steps:

  1. Copy a configuration script from the "/etc/basp/samples" directory to the "/etc/basp" directory. Note that the configuration script name must be prefixed with "team-".

  2. Modify the configuration script to:
    (a) change the team type
    (b) add/delete the physical network interfaces
    (c) add/delete the virtual network interfaces
    (d) assign IP address to each virtual network interface.

    The syntax of the configuration script can be found in the “BASP Configuration Scripts for Red Hat Distributions” section or in the /etc/basp/sample/team-sample script file itself. Note that when configuring Teaming, at least one Primary Adapter is required.

  1. Manually start the team for the first time:

    % /etc/init.d/basp start

NOTE This step is only required for the first time installation. The team configuration will be automatically started on subsequent reboots.

Note that if not all the virtual network interfaces are configured with an IP address, there will be an error message in starting the BASP team. When this happens, repeat Step (2) to configure an IP address for all the virtual network interfaces.

NOTE 1 Forming multiple teams is possible by copying the sample files into "/etc/basp/team-<name>" and modifying this file as described in the sample file.

NOTE 2 To create more that one virtual interface (VLAN) for each team, refer to the respective description section in the sample files.

 

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BASP Configuration and Startup for Other Linux Distributions

BASP Configuration (baspcfg) is a command line tool to configure the BASP teams, add/remove NICs, and add/remove virtual devices. This tool can be used in custom initialization scripts. Please read your distribution-specific documentation for more information on your distributors startup procedures.

Following is the usage of this tool:

baspcfg v3.0.14 - Broadcom Advanced Server Program Configuration Utility Copyright (c) 2000-2002 Broadcom Corporation. All rights reserved.

usage: baspcfg <commands>

commands:

addteam <tid> <type> <tname> create a team
delteam <tid> delete a team
addva <tid> <vlan_id> <vname> [macaddr] add a virtual adapter to a team
delva <tid> <vlan_id> del a virtual adapter from a team
bind <tid> <role> <device> bind a physical adapter to a team
unbind <tid> <device> unbind a physical adapter from a team
show [tid] display team configurations

where:

tid An unique ID for each team, starting from 0
type Team type: 0=SLB, 1=FEC/GEC, 2=802.3ad
tname ASCII string of the team
vlan_id VLAN ID: from 1 to 4094, 0=untagged or no VLAN
vname ASCII string of the virtual device
macaddr MAC address (optional), e.g. 00:10:18:00:11:44
role Role of the physical device: 0=primary, 1=hot-standby
device ASCII string of the physical device, e.g. eth0
NOTE Baspcfg can only be executed in Super User mode. Attempting to use baspcfg as a standard user will yield the error message, "Error in communicating to BASP Module. Is it loaded?".

When configuring Teaming, at lease one Primary Adapter is required.

 

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BASP Configuration Scripts for Red Hat Distributions

Both team-sample and team-gec are configuration scripts that follow the same syntax, as follows:

TEAM_ID: this number uniquely identifies a team
TEAM_TYPE: 0 = SLB, 1 = Generic Trunking/GEC/FEC, 2 = 802.3ad
TEAM_NAME: ascii name of the team
TEAM_PAx_NAME: ascii name of the physical interface x, where x can be 0 to 7
TEAM_PAx_ROLE: role of the physical interface x 0 = Primary, 1 = Hot-standby.
This field must be 0 for Generic Trunking/GEC/FEC team.
TEAM_VAx_NAME: ascii name of the virtual interface x, where x can be 0 to 63
TEAM_VAx_VLAN: 802.1Q VLAN ID of the virtual interface x.
For untagged virtual interface, i.e., without VLAN enable, set it to 0. The valid VLAN ID can be 0 to 4094.
TEAM_VAx_IP: IP address of the virtual interface x. The format should be aa.bb.cc.dd.

TEAM_VAx_NETMASK: Subnet mask of the virtual interface x. The format should mm.nn.oo.pp.
NOTE Teaming scripts are intended for Red Hat distributions ONLY. Use with other Linux distribution will cause an error.

 

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Broadcom NICE Patches

Also included in this release are network device drivers patched with Broadcom NICE support. These drivers are originally taken from the Linux 2.4.16 kernel distribution. To install patched drivers:

  1. Copy the Broadcom NICE header file, "nicext.h", to the appropriate Linux kernel include directory, e.g.

% cp /usr/src/nice-2.4.16/nicext.h /usr/src/linux/include/linux

  1. Rename the original network device driver under the Linux kernel source tree, "/usr/src/linux/drivers/net".

  2. Copy the patched drivers to the Linux kernel network driver source directory, i.e. "/usr/src/linux/drivers/net".

  3. Follow the kernel rebuild instructions to configure kernel support for these drivers.

% cd /usr/src/linux
% make config

  1. If the patched drivers are configured into the kernel, goto step (7). If the patched drivers are configured as modules, goto step (6).

  2. In the case of supporting only the module version of these drivers, it is possible to simply run the following to compile patched
    drivers and to install them into the proper module directory:

% make modules
% make modules_install

There is no need to compile the complete kernel. Goto step (8).

  1. Rebuild the kernel to compile these patched drivers

% make clean
% make dep
% make

  1. Either reboot the system or unload/load the patched modules. Run configuration scripts to test the patch.

 

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Uninstalling the BASP RPM Package (Both Source and Binary)

To uninstall RPM package,

% rpm -e basplnx

and to reboot the system,

% reboot

 

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Removal of Physical Interface in Generic Trunking and 802.3ad Mode

In Generic Trunking and 802.3ad mode, all the physical and virtual interfaces belonging to a team have the same MAC address. This MAC address is the same address as that of the first physical interface bounded to the team. In the case that this first physical interface is removed dynamically from the team using "baspcfg" tool and bounded to the protocol directly, this could lead to a duplicate MAC address problem on the network. Note that if the removed physical interface does not participate in any traffic, there will not be any problem.

To properly remove a physical interface, follow the steps listed below:

  1. Backup the original team configuration script

% cp /etc/basp/team-gec /etc/basp/backup-gec

NOTE 1 "team-gec" is the name of the configuration script.

NOTE 2 "backup-gec" is the name of the backup script. The name of the backup script must NOT be prefixed with "team-".
  1. Modify the team configuration script to remove the physical interface

  2. Stop the running team

% /etc/basp/baspif /etc/basp/backup-gec stop
% /etc/basp/baspteam /etc/basp/backup-gec del

  1. Restart the team

    % /etc/basp/baspteam /etc/basp/team-gec add
    % /etc/basp/baspif /etc/basp/team-gec start

 

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BASP SNMP Agent for Linux

This SNMP agent is designed to support the configuration and statistics information pertaining to the Broadcom BASP driver. The BASP SNMP agent is available in two packaging formats: TAR archive and RPM. Both packages include the exact same script and MIB files.

Installing the TAR Archive

To uncompress and expand the tar archive, run

% tar xvfz baspsnmp-{version}.tar

The installation process involves the following steps:

  1. Copy the getBaspInfo and genBaspTraps script files into /usr/bin directory.

  2. Copy the BASP-Config-MIB.txt, BASP-Statistics-MIB.txt and Brcm-BSAPTrap-MIB.txt into the /usr/share/snmp/mibs directory.

  3. Locate the snmpd.conf file. It is normally located at: /etc/snmp or /usr/lib/snmp or $HOME/.snmp and add the following lines to the snmpd.conf.

    pass .1.3.6.1.4.1.4413.1.2.1 /usr/bin/getBaspInfo
    pass .1.3.6.1.4.1.4413.1.2.2.1 /usr/bin/getBaspInfo
    pass .1.3.6.1.4.1.4413.1.2.2.2 /usr/bin/getBaspInfo
    pass .1.3.6.1.4.1.4413.1.2.2.3 /usr/bin/getBaspInfo

  4. Stop the snmpd daemon and restart it again.

% /etc/init.d/snmpd stop
% /etc/init.d/snmpd start

  1. Run the genBaspTraps script to allow monitoring of the BASP trap
    events:

    % genBaspTraps

    This script can be terminated by hitting Ctrl-C keys if BASP trap event
    monitoring is no longer needed.

  2. The snmpget and snmpgetnext commands can be used to receive the BASP snmp objects such as:

    % snmpget localhost public BASP-Config-MIB::btTeamNumber
    % snmpgetnext localhost public BASP-Config-MIB::btTeamNumber

    BASP SNMP objects are provided in the following text files:


Installing the RPM Package

Complete the following steps to install BASP SNMP agent from the RPM package.

  1. To install the RPM package, run

    % rpm -i baspsnmp-{version}.i386.rpm

    The BASP script and MIB files will be installed. The snmpd.conf configuration file will me modified to add support for the BASP SNMP agent.

  2. Follow steps 4 - 6 in the "Installing the TAR Archive" section.
NOTE The current RPM installation fails to append the additional directives needed to the snmpd.conf file to support Basp objects. Thus please follow the instruction (3) in the Install - TAR archive to modify the snmpd.conf file.

SNMP Files

genBaspTrap script monitoring the BASP trap events
getBaspInfo script to process SNMP get/getnext inquiries
BASP-Config-MIB.txt SNMP MIB file for BASP configuration objects
BASP-Statistics-MIB.txt SNMP MIB file for BASP statistics objects
Brcm-BSAPTrap-MIB.txt SNMP MIB file for BASP trap objects
release.txt this file


Uninstalling the SNMP RPM Package

To uninstall RPM package, run:

% rpm -e baspsnmp-{version}.i386.rpm

and to reboot the system,

% reboot

 

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Known Problems

  1. 802.3ad team member links disconnect and reconnect continuously when connected to the HP2524 switch. This is a 3rd party issue. It is seen only when configuring an 802.3ad team with greater than 2 members on the server and connecting an HP2524 switch, with lacp enabled as passive or active. The HP switch will show an lacp channel being brought up successfully with only 2 members. All other member's links will disconnect and reconnect. This does not occur with a Cisco Catalyst 6500.

 

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Please read all restrictions and disclaimers.